November 2010 Memo

ROW of my bookshelf are a group of life-size cutout faces. Oversized tongue depressors are fastened to the back and eyeholes have been punched out so you can hold them in front of your face like a mask.

They are a bunch of scary looking faces because, well, they are all of me.

My mom, who apparently had way too much time on her hands one day, put these masks together and coerced LOGOI’s office staff to “wear” them for my birthday a couple years back. The first mask is of me as a baby, the next as a toddler, then grade school, high school, college, wedding day, until finally…she ran out of ink.

It’s a little weird to sit at my desk, look up and see a group of “young Eddies” staring at me. I’ve thought about taking them down several times but I’ve sort of grown on myself (insert drum rip here).

One mask, however, is wonderfully different from the others. It draws my eyes and attention every time I look up at the shelf and I can’t help but stop and stare. It so engages me, in fact, it’s as if all the other masks on the shelf simply fade away. I know exactly when the picture for this mask was taken. It was on September 1, 1984 and the sparkling eyes and radiant smile looking back at me from my shelf belong to my bride.

I’ve always struggled a bit with God calling me His “bride.” I’d feel a lot better if God simply wanted me to be a groomsman. There’s a lot less pressure and expectations for groomsman. Just stand there, smile, and try to not trip down the aisle. Being “bride,” however, comes with making sacred and solemn vows of commitment and love along with other things like unselfishness, patience, and never ending hope.

Here’s what bothers me. If I were God, I would never have chosen me to be His bride. But don’t get a big head, I don’t know why He chose you, either. It’s an awesome thought, isn’t it? All we can do is stand in awe and be thankful.

My Dad, LOGOI’s Founder and resident theologian, constantly reminds me that LOGOI’s ministry is all about helping God’s bride get ready for the wedding. “That is our only job,” he says, usually with eyes full of tears. All of our work and time is dedicated to helping the church—His Bride—fall deeply in love with Jesus.

From Cuba to Chile, Mexico to Spain, we have the joy and privilege of helping prepare God’s bride. Sometimes that means a squealing pig in Cuba. Sometimes it is a pastor’s retreat in Nicaragua. Sometimes it’s a Bible resource only obtainable via our website. In all these ways and more, what a joy to see the “bride’s” face light up with joy.

As I write this letter, I’m thrilled to report we are sending Les and Carolyn Thompson to Cuba along with at least 50 squealing pigs (for pastors). But we don’t want it to stop there. In fact, this Thanksgiving, we’d like you to consider buying some pork. Hundreds more pastors are still waiting. As a reminder, here’s how it works:

  1. PROVIDE ON-GOING PASTORAL TRAINING, help, materials and much needed encouragement to a Cuban pastor throughout the entire year.
  2. BUY HIM A PIG. The idea is to not eat the pig…at least not right away. Rather, pastors are to mate the pigs (twice per year) and then sell the piglets. In their economy, the funds collected from selling the piglets will help provide a basic means of sustenance. The roast comes later…

So come on! How about a little “pork” this Thanksgiving. What a great, meaningful, and fun way to serve Christ…and His bride.

Happy Thanksgiving,

Ed Thompson